Footprint Blog


Caviar: A wonderful tale of stock replenishment

pettrossian.com

pettrossian.com

Caviar, possibly one of the greatest symbols of wealth, could assume quite a different status with commendable ecological side effects.

Caviar is in desperately short supply due to the unsustainable harvesting of the wild sturgeon in the Caspian Sea, where most of the world’s caviar¬†is presently produced. The situation became dire after the break up of the Soviet Union, which led to the virtual collapse of management and control systems. A century ago, rivers and seas were stuffed with sturgeon, even in Britain.

Sergei Trachook who owns a fish farm called Mottra, near Riga in Latvia has a vision that ‘one day our rivers will be teeming again’, according to The Times.

Mr Trachook doesn’t kill his sturgeon, instead milks the fish for their roe using ultrasound technology and massage, before swiftly returning them unharmed into temperature controlled tanks. He has started to deposit young fish into the nearby Daugva River with a view to replenishing wild stocks.

50g of farmed Mottra Osetra is half the price of wild caviar and once he opens more farms, he will be able to bring the price down even further. Mottra is not the only eco-friendly caviar farm but he claims that other farmed caviar producers make a larger incision, which must be sewn up afterwards, thereby limiting the times the fish can be milked.

According to The Times top chefs are already taking note. Richard Corrigan has put it on the menu of his Mayfair restaurant, Corrigan’s, ‘impressed as much by its clean flavour as by its green credentials’.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: